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How do I grade student responses to writing prompts?

Who can do this with default capabilities?

Teachers

Once you have assigned students a writing prompt, and they have completed it, it's time to grade their work! While comprehension question assignments are graded immediately by the computer, writing assignments require teacher grading.

There are three ways to grade student writing.

Grading Method #1

Select Reports in the left navigation bar and then select ELA. Then, scroll down to select Article Writing Report. "Ungraded Writing Assignments" will appear at the top of the page. By selecting   Grade on the right of the following page, you will be able to review writing assignments by article.

Grading Method #2

Select Assignments in the left navigation bar. Make sure you have the correct class selected in the drop-down list at the top of the page. Below, you will see a list of current assignments to students. If you select the blue arrow to the left , you will be able to see each student's individual assignment. By selecting the blue arrow to the right of a particular student   , you will be able to pull up the writing assignment list page.

Grading Method #3

Select Activity Feed in the left navigation bar. You can choose to select writing only in the ELA drop-down list or just scroll down to find the student whose assignment you'd like to review. Select the drop-down icon on the left of the student's name. If the assignment is complete, a blue arrow will appear on the right side   . By selecting this arrow, it will take you to the same review page.

All three methods described above will get you to this page—reviewing all assignments on an article. Select See Results.

Here is an example of a prompt preview once you have selected See Results on the left side.

An example of a writing prompt and one student's response. The skills assessed are listed on the right, along with the 1 to 4 scale for grading. The Save button is under the scale.

Once reviewed, you can give a grade of 1, 2, 3, or 4 to the student.

The following grading scale is used:

  1. Below Grade Level
  2. Approaching Grade Level
  3. At Grade Level
  4. Exceeding Grade Level

Select Save when you are done. You will see that that the student's assignment is now listed as Graded. You are always able to go back to review students' work once it is graded.

We leave the grading of Freckle writing responses up to the teacher, as every class, school, and grade has different standards and expectations for writing. However, we have also come up with three basic rubrics, one for each type of writing, and welcome you to use them. For each rubric, level 4 represents the highest quality response in terms of thoroughness and development, with level 1 being the lowest.

You can find each of the rubrics below:

Opinion/Argument Writing Rubric

1 2 3 4
  • The response lacks organization and has a confusing or unclear opinion/argument. The argument is unfocused, and there is no introduction and/or conclusion.
  • There is minimal or irrelevant support/evidence for the opinion.
  • The response does not use correct writing conventions (grammar, punctuation, capitalization, and spelling) and uses limited or ineffective vocabulary.
  • The response is inconsistently organized and/or has an unclear opinion/argument. At times, the argument is unfocused. The introduction and conclusion, if present, are weak.
  • The support/evidence used is weak, vague, imprecise, or repetitive.
  • The response uses inadequate writing conventions (grammar, punctuation, capitalization, and spelling) and inappropriate or ineffective vocabulary.
  • The response is adequately organized with a clear opinion/argument and a sufficient progression of ideas. There is an adequate introduction and conclusion.
  • The response includes adequate support/evidence that is relevant to the argument. Some evidence might be general.
  • The response uses mostly appropriate writing conventions (grammar, punctuation, capitalization, and spelling) as well as grade-level vocabulary.
  • The response is effectively organized with a clearly stated opinion/argument and a logical progression of ideas. There is an effective introduction and conclusion.
  • The response includes thorough and convincing support/evidence that is relevant and specific to the argument.
  • The response consistently uses appropriate writing conventions (grammar, punctuation, capitalization, and spelling) as well as grade-level vocabulary.

Informational/Expository Writing Rubric

1 2 3 4
  • The response lacks organization and has a confusing main idea. The progression of ideas is unclear and/or there are extraneous ideas. There is no introduction and/or conclusion.
  • The supporting ideas are weak, vague, imprecise, and repetetive, and there is no elaboration.
  • The response does not use correct writing conventions (grammar, punctuation, capitalization, and spelling) and uses limited or ineffective vocabulary.
  • The response is inconsistently organized and/or has a drifting focus. Ideas are loosely connected. The introduction and conclusion, if present, are weak.
  • The supporting ideas are weak, vague, imprecise, or repetitive, and there is little effective elaboration.
  • The response uses inadequate writing conventions (grammar, punctuation, capitalization, and spelling) and inappropriate or ineffective vocabulary.
  • The response is organized with a clear main idea. Some ideas may be loosely connected, but the progression of ideas is adequate. There is a sufficient introduction and conclusion.
  • The response includes adequate supporting ideas and some effective elaboration.
  • The response uses mostly appropriate writing conventions, (grammar, punctuation, capitalization, and spelling) as well as grade-level vocabulary.
  • The response is effectively organized with a clearly-communicated and focused main idea. There is a logical progression of supporting ideas, as well as an effective introduction and conclusion.
  • The response includes clear and thorough supporting ideas and effective elaboration.
  • The response consistently uses appropriate writing conventions (grammar, punctuation, capitalization, and spelling) as well as grade-level vocabulary.

Narrative Writing Rubric

1 2 3 4
  • The narrative, whether real or imagined, has little or no focus, and may just be a series of events. There is no established beginning or ending to the narrative.
  • The narrative has no discernible plot, and there is no attempt to establish a setting, characters, or a point of view.
  • There is no development of the characters, setting, or events/experiences throughout the narrative.
  • There is no use of dialogue, sensory language, or other narrative techniques.
  • The narrative does not use correct writing conventions (grammar, punctuation, capitalization, and spelling) and uses limited or ineffective vocabulary.
  • The narrative, whether real or imagined, is not focused and has an unclear sequence of events. The beginning and ending of the narrative, if present, are weak.
  • The narrative has an inconsistent plot, and the setting, characters, and point of view are not clearly established.
  • There is minimal development of the characters, setting, and events/experiences throughout the narrative.
  • There is only partial or weak use of dialogue, sensory language, or other narrative techniques.
  • The narrative uses inadequate writing conventions (grammar, punctuation, capitalization, and spelling) and inappropriate or ineffective vocabulary.
  • The narrative, whether real or imagined, is adequately organized and focused, and follows an acceptable sequence of events from beginning to end. There is a hook to the narrative, as well as a conclusion.
  • The plot, setting, characters, and point of view of the narrative are evident.
  • There is adequate development of the characters, setting, and events/experiences throughout the narrative.
  • Dialogue, sensory language, and other narrative techniques are adequately used.
  • The narrative uses mostly appropriate writing conventions (grammar, punctuation, capitalization, and spelling) as well as grade-level vocabulary.
  • The narrative, whether real or imagined, is well-organized, focused, and follows a logical sequence of events from beginning to end. There is a strong hook and a clear conclusion to the narrative.
  • The narrative has a clear plot, and the setting, characters, and point of view are effectively established.
  • The narrative includes elaboration and details that help develop the characters, setting, and events/experiences.
  • Dialogue, sensory language, and other narrative techniques are effectively used.
  • The narrative consistently uses appropriate writing conventions (grammar, punctuation, capitalization, and spelling) as well as grade-level vocabulary.